Ida crosses into Mississippi on path to Mid-Atlantic states; Gulf coast facing ‘dangerous storm surge’

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(WGHP) — Ida has crossed into southwestern Mississippi as a tropical storm, bringing “dangerous storm surge, damaging winds and flash flooding,” according to the National Hurricane Center.

As of 5 a.m. Monday, Ida was about 95 miles south-southwest of Jackson, Mississippi, and about 50 miles north-northwest of Baton Rouge, Louisiana.

The tropical storm is moving 8 mph to the north with maximum sustained winds of 60 mph.

A Storm Surge Warning is in effect for Grand Isle, Louisiana, to the Alabama/Florida border. A Tropical Storm Warning is in effect for Grand Isle, Louisiana, to the Alabama/Florida border, including Lake Pontchartrain, Lake Maurepas and Metropolitan New Orleans.

The National Hurricane Center reports that Ida is expected to continue north throughout Monday, moving over central and northeastern Mississippi Monday afternoon and night.

Forecasters believe Ida will weaken to a tropical depression by Monday evening.

Monday night and Tuesday, Ida is expected to pick up pace towards the northeast and cross the Tennessee Valley.

Middle Tennessee Valley, Ohio Valley, central/southern Appalachians and the Mid-Atlantic could see 3 to 6 inches of rain with isolated higher amounts Tuesday into Wednesday.

“Considerable flash flooding” is possible from the lower Mississippi Valley through the middle Tennessee Valley, Ohio Valley, central/southern Appalachians, and into the Mid-Atlantic, according to the NHC.

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