GREENSBORO, N.C. (WGHP) — If want to celebrate Independence Day with a bang, you’re in the right place!

Independence Day Weekend at Wise Man Brewing

A Winston-Salem brewery is inviting the public to join them for food, gas, sparklers and more to celebrate the Fourth of July.

Saturday through Monday, Wise Man Brewing will be hosting the event at the brewery located at 826 Angelo Brothers Ave.

Saturday

From 12 p.m. to 12 a.m. Saturday, you’ll have a chance to try new beer releases Full Current Blueberry Lemon Gose and Lighting Up and Live Session IPA.

For food, you can catch Smokin’ BBQ Chateau from 12 p.m. to 4 p.m., Galaxy Icees from 2 p.m. to 5 p.m. and Khrissy’s Kitchen from 5 p.m. to 10 p.m.

Pure Fiyah Reggae Band will perform from 7 p.m. to 11 p.m.

There won’t be fireworks, but you can join them for sparklers at 9 p.m.

Sunday

On Sunday, you can join them from 12 p.m. to 10 p.m. extended hours.

My Kitchen will be there from 1 p.m to 8 p.m., and Vinyl Night runs from 5 p.m. to 7:30 p.m.

You’ll also be able to try beer releases Happiness is the Truth Mango Orange Hefeweizen and Circumstance of Collision w/ Strawberry, Raspberry, Blueberry and Lemon Dry-Hopped Sour.

Monday

Finally, on Monday, the brewery offers extended hours from 12 p.m. to 10 p.m.

Urban Street Grill will be on scene from 12 p.m. to 8 p.m., and you can join in for Conceited Genius Trivia from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m.

You can also try beer release Sufficient Wit w/ Orange, Mango, and Peach.

Fireworks at the Winston-Salem Dash game

You can join the Winston-Salem Dash on July 4 at Truist Stadium for what they’re calling “the best fireworks in town.”

The local baseball team is set to play against the Wilmington Blue Rocks at 6:30 p.m.

Fireworks begin after the game.

Tickets are available online starting at $10.

Which fireworks are legal for me to use?

In North Carolina, you should have no problem using wire sparklers, snake and glow worms, smoke devices, party poppers, string poppers and snappers/drop pops, according to North Carolina General Statute.

You can also use the kind of fireworks that “emit showers of sparks and sometimes a whistling or crackling effect when burning” so long as they do not detonate, explode, spin, propel themselves through the air, contain more than 75 grams of chemical compound per tube or contain more than a total of 200 grams if multiple tubes are used.

Here’s the exact language used in the general statute:

  • Explosive caps designed to be fired in toy pistols, provided that the explosive mixture of the explosive caps shall not exceed twenty-five hundredths (.25) of a gram for each cap.
  • Snake and glow worms composed of pressed pellets of a pyrotechnic mixture that produce a large, snake-like ash when burning.
  • Smoke devices consisting of a tube or sphere containing a pyrotechnic mixture that produces white or colored smoke.
  • Trick noisemakers which produce a small report designed to surprise the user and which include:
    • A party popper, which is a small plastic or paper item containing not in excess of 16 milligrams of explosive mixture. A string protruding from the device is pulled to ignite the device, expelling paper streamers and producing a small report.
    • A string popper, which is a small tube containing not in excess of 16 milligrams of explosive mixture with string protruding from both ends. The strings are pulled to ignite the friction-sensitive mixture, producing a small report.
    • A snapper or drop pop, which is a small, paper-wrapped item containing no more than 16 milligrams of explosive mixture coated on small bits of sand. When dropped, the device produces a small report.
  • Wire sparklers consisting of wire or stick coated with nonexplosive pyrotechnic mixture that produces a shower of sparks upon ignition. These items must not exceed 100 grams of mixture per item.
  • Other sparkling devices which emit showers of sparks and sometimes a whistling or crackling effect when burning, do not detonate or explode, do not spin, are hand-held or ground-based, cannot propel themselves through the air, and contain not more than 75 grams of chemical compound per tube, or not more than a total of 200 grams if multiple tubes are used. (1947, c. 210, s. 5; 1955, c. 674, s. 1; 1993, c. 437.)