WASHINGTON, D.C. (WGHP) – Two years ago today, thousands of supporters of former President Donald Trump, allegedly inspired by Trump’s unfounded rhetoric about a stolen election, stormed the U.S. Capitol in a deadly siege that sought to change American democracy.

We know now, based on the report by the bipartisan Jan. 6 committee, why and how they decided to try to disrupt the constitutional process overseen by Vice President Mike Pence to cement President Joe Biden’s election in November 2020.

FILE – Rioters loyal to President Donald Trump rally at the U.S. Capitol in Washington on Jan. 6, 2021. The House committee investigating the Jan. 6 attack on the U.S. Capitol is expected to interview former Secret Service agent Tony Ornato on Tuesday about Donald Trump’s actions on the day of the insurrection. (AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana, File)

We watched in horror as they broke through windows and doors, discarded barricades and overran Capitol police and other guards to parade through the halls of Congress even as members of the House and Senate hid in fear and pleaded for help in securing the building and protecting themselves.

The actions of insurrectionists that day and the threat posed to the democratic process led Congress in December to pass reforms to ensure the peaceful transfer of power.

We also know the tragedies insurrectionists brought to the Capitol before they left late that afternoon: There were hundreds of injuries to law enforcement officers, death threats on the life of Pence and others, and, ultimately, seven lives were lost during or after the insurrection.

More than 465 have pleaded guilty and about 335 of them have been sentenced.

There are ongoing trials for seditious conspiracy involving the leaders of the right-wing militia groups Oath Keepers and Proud Boys, especially their leaders, Enrique Tarrio and Stewart Rhodes, and the people who helped them organize their members for their raids on the Capitol.

There have been 25 residents of North Carolina who have been charged with crimes in federal courts – numerous other names have been linked to charges – and several of them are affiliated with those organizations.

Triad connections

Six of those charged or convicted are residents of the Piedmont Triad. Some are appearing as witnesses in those ongoing proceedings. Some are awaiting sentencing. Some are behind bars.

Charles Donohue of Kernersville and Laura Steele of Thomasville, a former police officer, are two headline cases involving militia groups. He has pleaded guilty, and she is facing trial next month.

Donohue and Jeremy Bertino of Belmont, charged with helping to plan the Proud Boys’ attack on the Capitol, are witnesses in a case being tried right now.

The Charlotte Observer reported that more arrests are expected, citing that “the Federal Public Defender’s Office in Charlotte seeking legal representation for Jan. 6 defendants in 700-1,200 new cases are pending nationally, most of them felonies.”

And let it be clear that North Carolina is one of the key areas as those investigations are continuing. The state’s 25 defendants are the 11th most, with Florida (98), Texas (74) and Pennsylvania (73) leading the way.

  • Stewart Rhodes,Amit Mehta
  • Stewart Rhodes
  • Kelli Ward
  • Bennie Thompson, Liz Cheney
  • Kelli Ward
  • Phillip Linder, James Lee Bright
  • Stewart Rhodes
  • Stewart Rhodes
  • Thomas Caldwell
  • Lisa Banes
  • Thomas Caldwell
  • Mike Fanone
  • Ken Paxton
  • Hiring, Retail sales, consumer confidence
  • Darrell Fitzgerald Neely allegedly seen on U.S. Capitol surveillance video on Jan. 6.
  • Darrell Fitzgerald Neely allegedly seen on U.S. Capitol surveillance video on Jan. 6.

The newest cases

Steele, a former High Point Police Officer and member of Oath Keepers, is scheduled to go on trial starting Feb. 1 – one of several defendants who could see their cases end in the first two months of the year – but the most recently named defendant is Bertino, who is a ranking member of the Proud Boys and expected to testify in the trial against Tarrio.

Bertino was charged on Oct. 6 with seditious conspiracy and unlawful possession of a firearm, and he pleaded guilty that same day. No sentencing date is set, but he faces 51 to 63 months in prison and fines of $20,000 to $200,000.

In a similar position is William Todd Wilson of Newton Grove. He is a member of the Oath Keepers charged with leader Stewart Rhodes on two counts and is said to have helped plan the attack. He is said to be the first Oath Keeper to enter the Capitol.

He pleaded guilty on the day he was charged, May 4, to seditious conspiracy and obstruction of an official proceeding. No sentencing date has been set, but he could face a prison term of between 63 and 78 months and fines of $25,000 to $250,000. He has agreed to $2,000 in restitution and waived various rights.

Also up soon for formal sentencing are the husband-wife team of Dale Jeremiah “DJ” Shalvey and Tara Aileen Stottlemyer Shalvey of Conover, who pleaded guilty in October to obstruction of an official proceeding. DJ Shalvey also faces a charge of assaulting a police officer.

She is scheduled to be sentenced on Jan. 20 and could face a prison sentence of 15 to 21 months plus fines. He is scheduled to be sentenced on Feb. 24 and could face a prison sentence of 41 to 51 months plus fines.

Hundreds prosecuted

Wood was arrested on March 5, 2021, after he voluntarily surrendered to the FBI and admitted he entered the Capitol through broken windows. He was indicted on March 17, 2021, and pleaded not guilty to six charges at his arraignment six days later.

Wood is one of six residents of the Piedmont Triad and 25 from North Carolina who are among more than 950 people in 48 states who have been charged with crimes during the insurrection, based on a database maintained by USA TODAY. More than 465 have pleaded guilty and about 335 of them have been sentenced.

There were hundreds of injuries to law enforcement officers, much destruction of propertythreats on the life of Vice President Mike Pence and others, and, ultimately, seven lives were lost during or after the insurrection. There also have been all those legal proceedings.

The House Select Committee referred four criminal charges against Trump, and the Department of Justice is investigating. A special counsel also has been appointed to oversee several investigations involving Trump.

The Jan. 6 cases from North Carolina

A Reidsville man, Matthew Mark Wood, received one of the more lenient sentences last month when he was granted 3 years of probation, including 12 months of home detention, 100 hours of community service and $2,000 restitution for being the 10th rioter through the doors of the Capitol and among the last to leave.

But he was one of the 25 defendants from the state. Here is where those cases stand.

Stephen Maury Baker

FROM: Garner

ARRESTED: Feb. 1, 2021. ARRAIGNED: April 27, 2021 (pleaded not guilty to two charges).

CHARGES: Pleaded guilty on May 10, 2022, to:

  • Parading, demonstrating or picketing in a Capitol building

SENTENCE: 24 months of probation after 9 days of intermittent confinement (3 consecutive weekends) and $500 restitution.

Matthew Jason Beddingfield

FROM: Smithfield

ARRESTED: Feb. 8, 2022

CHARGES:

  • Civil disorder
  • Entering and remaining in a restricted building or grounds with a dangerous or deadly weapon
  • Disorderly and disruptive conduct in a restricted building or grounds
  • Engaging in physical violence in a restricted building or grounds
  • Disorderly and disruptive conduct in Capitol building
  • Impeding passage through Capitol grounds or buildings
  • Act of physical violence in Capitol grounds or buildings
  • Parading, demonstrating or picketing in a Capitol building

STATUS: No update since Feb. 8

Bradley Stuart Bennett

FROM: Charlotte

ARRESTED: April 12, 2021. INDICTED: April 21, 2021. ARRAIGNED: Pleaded not guilty. ARRAIGNED: April 29, 2021 (pleaded not guilty). REINDICTED ON TRUE BILL: Jan. 1, 2022

CHARGES:

  • Obstruction of an official proceeding
  • Entering and remaining in a restricted building or grounds
  • Disorderly and disruptive conduct in a restricted building or grounds
  • Entering and remaining in the Gallery of Congress
  • Disorderly conduct in a Capitol building
  • Parading, demonstrating or picketing in a Capitol building
  • Obstruction of justice/official proceeding

STATUS: Trial is scheduled for Feb. 21.

Jeremy Bertino

FROM: Belmont

CHARGED: Oct. 6, 2022.

CHARGES: Bertino is charged as a member of the Proud Boys along with Charles Donohue and pleaded guilty on the same day he was charged, Oct. 6, to two counts. He is expected to testify in the Proud Boys conspiracy trial:

  • Seditious conspiracy
  • Unlawful possession of a firearm

STATUS: No sentencing date has been set. He could face 51 to 63 months in prison and fines of $20,000 to $200,000. He has agreed to restitution of $2,000 and could seek to be placed in witness protection. He also waived various rights.

Aiden Bilyard captured in a photograph on Jan. 6. (DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE)

Aiden Bilyard

FROM: Raleigh

ARRESTED: Nov. 22, 2001

CHARGES: Charged on eight counts related to being in the Capitol and wielding a dangerous weapon, he pleaded guilty on Oct. 20 to one count:

  • Assaulting, resisting or impeding certain officers using a deadly and dangerous weapon.

STATUS: Faces a potential sentence of 46 to 57 months. Sentencing is scheduled for Feb. 2.

Lewis Easton Cantwell

FROM: Asheville

INDICTED: Feb. 5, 2021. ARRESTED: Feb. 18, 2021.

CHARGES: Pleaded guilty on March 24, 2022, to Count 1 of six original charges:

  • Obstructing, impeding or interfering with law enforcement during the commission of civil disorder and aiding and abetting.

SENTENCE: Dec. 6, 2022, to 5 months in prison. 3 years of probation.

Charles Donohoe

Charles Donohoe
Charles Donohoe

FROM: Kernersville

ARRESTED: March 17, 2021. ARRAIGNED: April 6, 2021. SUPERSEDING INDICTMENT: March 7, 2022.

CHARGES: Pleaded guilty on April 8, 2022, to two of six original charges:

  • Obstruction of an official proceeding and aiding and abetting
  • Assaulting, resisting or impeding certain officers

STATUS: Donohoe was state president of Proud Boys and was affiliated with five members charged with seditious conspiracy. No sentencing date is set. He faces up to 8 years in prison and fines of up to $250,000. The judge has said jail time is likely. He is expected to testify this year against the leaders of the Proud Boys.

Edward George Jr.

FROM: Fayetteville

ARRESTED: July 24, 2021. SUPERSEDING INDICTMENT: Superseding indictment of 9 charges in July 2021

CHARGES:

  • Obstruction of an official proceeding and aiding and abetting
  • Entering and remaining in a restricted building or grounds
  • Disorderly and disruptive conduct in a restricted building or grounds
  • Entering and remaining in the Gallery of Congress
  • Disorderly conduct in a Capitol building
  • Parading, demonstrating or picketing in a Capitol building
  • Civil disorder
  • Assaulting, resisting or impeding certain officers
  • Theft of government property, aiding and abetting

STATUS: No update to his file since August 2021. He remains free on personal recognizance.

Joseph David Gietzen

FROM: Sanford

INDICTED: April 1, 2022. ARRESTED: May 11, 2022.

CHARGES: He is shown in the court filings as struggling with police outside the Capitol. In one video, the filing says, “an officer winds up surrounded by members of the crowd and Gietzen appears to grab the officer by the throat or face mask.” He later is seen holding a long pole and seen to “hit the officer next to him with the pole, striking him in the shoulder between his protective gear.” He also is identified, the report says, as being in the front of the throng and extending the poll as they attempt to get past law enforcement officers.

  • Civil disorder aiding and abetting
  • Assaulting, resisting or impeding certain officers, 2 counts
  • Assaulting, resisting or impeding certain officers, using a dangerous weapon
  • Entering and remaining in a restricted building or grounds with a deadly or dangerous weapon
  • Disorderly and disruptive conduct in a restricted building or grounds
  • Engaging in physical violence in a restricted building or grounds
  • Acts of physical violence in the Capitol grounds or buildings

STATUS: No update since May 11.

Tate James Grant

FROM: Cary

ARRESTED: Oct. 14, 2021. SUPERSEDING INDICTMENT: Dec. 15, 2021

CHARGES: The charging document says that video images show Grant inside the Senate offices.

  • Civil disorder
  • Assaulting, resisting or impeding certain officers using a dangerous weapon or inflicting bodily injury
  • Obstruction of an official proceeding
  • Entering and remaining in a restricted building or grounds
  • Disorderly and disruptive conduct in a restricted building or grounds
  • Entering and remaining in certain rooms in the Capitol building
  • Disorderly conduct in a Capitol building
  • Acts of physical violence in the Capitol grounds or buildings
  • Parading, demonstrating or picketing in a Capitol building

STATUS: No update since Dec. 20, 2021.

Johnny Harris

FROM: Shelby

ARRESTED: March 18, 2021. ARRAIGNED: May 27, 2021 (pleaded not guilty).

CHARGES:

  • Knowingly entering or remaining in any restricted building or grounds without lawful authority
  • Knowingly, with intent to impede government business or official functions
  • Engaging in disorderly conduct on Capitol grounds
  • Engaging in disorderly or disruptive conduct on the Capitol buildings or grounds
  • Parading, demonstrating or picketing in a Capitol building

STATUS: Remains on personal recognizance. A bench trial is scheduled for Feb. 27.

Ethan Stephen Horn

FROM: Raleigh

ARRESTED: April 9, 2021. CHARGED: April 13, 2021. ARRAIGNED: April 27, 2021 (pleaded not guilty)

CHARGES:

  • Entering and remaining in a restricted building or grounds
  • Disorderly and disruptive conduct in a restricted building or grounds
  • Violent entry and disorderly conduct in a Capitol building
  • Parading, demonstrating or picketing in a Capitol building

STATUS: Remains on personal recognizance. There has been no update since September 2021.

James Little

FROM: Claremont

CHARGES:

  • Pleaded guilty to Count 4 of five original charges: Parading, demonstrating or picketing in a Capitol building

SENTENCED: March 21, 2022, to 60 days in jail to be followed by 36 months of probation and $500 restitution.

Phillip James Mault

FROM: Fort Bragg

CHARGES:

SENTENCED: July 15 to 44 months in prison, 3 years of supervised release and $2,000 restitution.

Cleveland Meredith Jr.

FROM: Hayesville

ARRESTED: Jan. 8, 2021. INDICTED: Feb. 26, 2021. SUPERSEDING INDICTMENT: April 2, 2021. ARRAIGNED: Aug. 11, 2021 (pleaded not guilty).

CHARGES: He arrived in Washington armed and was founded to have made threats against House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and others. He pleaded guilty on Sept. 10, 2021, to one count of four.

  • Interstate communication and threats

SENTENCED: Dec. 14, 2021, to 28 months in prison, followed by 36 months of supervised release. 

Benjamin Robinson

FROM: Matthews

ARRESTED: May 20, 2022

CHARGES: Investigators say they identified a man named Linwood Robinson by matching video to a prior arrest photo and his cell phone records. Benjamin Robinson is one of Linwood Robinson’s two sons (with Linwood Alan Robinson II, a daughter-in-law (Brittany Nicole Robinson) and an unnamed grandchild who were observed inside the Capitol building. The report says they were unlawfully on the grounds and engaged in disorderly and disruptive conduct. It’s unclear why the complaint lists only one family member.

  • Entering and remaining in a restricted building or grounds
  • Disorderly and disruptive conduct in a restricted building or grounds
  • Disorderly conduct in a Capitol building
  • Parading, demonstrating or picketing in a Capitol building

STATUS: No update since the arrest.

Anthony Joseph Scirica

Law enforcement reviewed security footage from about 2:27 p.m. Jan. 6 in Statutory Hall which allegedly shows Scirica. (US District Attorney for Washington DC)

FROM: Winston-Salem

ARRESTED: June 16, 2021. CHARGED: July 8, 2021

CHARGES:

  • Pleaded guilty to one of four original charges: Parading, demonstrating or picketing in a Capitol building

SENTENCED: Jan. 20, 2022, to 15 days of incarceration, $500 fine and $500 restitution.

Dale Jeremiah “DJ” Shalvey

FROM: Conover

CHARGED WITH: His wife, Tara Aileen Shalvey

ARRESTED: March 9, 2021. INDICTED: April 30, 2021. ARRAIGNED: May 18, 2021 (pleaded not guilty to all charges). SUPERSEDING INDICTMENT: Feb. 2, 2022

CHARGES: Charged with his wife, he pleaded guilty on Oct. 3 to two counts of the original six he had faced and agreed to cooperate with investigators by allowing them access to his social media accounts:

  • Obstruction of an official proceeding and aiding and abetting
  • Assaulting a police officer

STATUS: He is scheduled to be sentenced on Feb. 24 and could face a prison sentence of 41 to 51 months and fines between $15,000 and $150,000.

Grayson Sherrill

FROM: Cherryville

ARRESTED: March 1, 2001. SUPERSEDING INDICTMENT: Dec. 16, 2021

CHARGES:

  • Civil disorder
  • Assaulting, resisting or impeding certain officers, using a dangerous or deadly weapon
  • Entering and remaining in a restricted building or grounds with a dangerous or deadly weapon
  • Disorderly and disruptive conduct in a restricted building or grounds, with deadly or dangerous weapon
  • Engaging in physical violence in a restricted building or grounds with a deadly or dangerous weapon
  • Act of physical violence in Capitol grounds or buildings
  • Entering and remaining in a restricted building or grounds
  • Disorderly and disruptive conduct in a restricted building or grounds
  • Disorderly and disruptive conduct in Capitol building
  • Parading, demonstrating or picketing in a Capitol building

STATUS: His charges were separated from original indictment that included Elliot Bishal and Elisa Irizarry. No update since Jan. 3, 2022

Christopher Raphael (Chris) Spencer (indicted with Virginia Marie Spencer)

Christopher Spencer (US DOJ)

FROM: Winston-Salem

ARRESTED: Jan. 19, 2021. CHARGED: Jan. 23, 2021. SUPERSEDING INDICTMENT: March 10, 2021. ARRAIGNMENT: Pleaded not guilty to all counts on March 31, 2021.

CHARGES: Video evidence in listed in the statement of facts showed Spencer at various times inside the Capitol during the insurrection. He is said to be among a group of men who were berating and cursing police officers and yelling “break it down” at the door to the House of Representatives.

  • Obstruction of an official proceeding and aiding and abetting
  • Entering and remaining in a restricted building or grounds
  • Disorderly and disruptive conduct in a restricted building or grounds
  • Disorderly conduct in Capitol building
  • Parading, demonstrating or picketing in a Capitol building

STATUS: No update since Aug. 4, 2021, following a status conference.

Virginia Maria “Jenny” Spencer of Pilot Mountain (DOJ)

Virginia Marie (Jenny) Spencer

FROM: Durham

ARRESTED: Feb. 8, 2021. SUPERSEDING INDICTMENT: March 10, 2021. ARRAIGNMENT: Pleaded not guilty to all counts on March 31, 2021.

CHARGES:

  • Pleaded guilty Sept. 9, 2021, to one of five original counts: Parading, demonstrating or picketing in a Capitol building

SENTENCED: Jan. 19 to 90 days incarceration, $500 restitution

Laura Steele

Surveillance image allegedly shows Laura Steele in the U.S. Capitol.
Surveillance image allegedly shows Laura Steele in the U.S. Capitol. (US DOJ)

FROM: Thomasville

ARRESTED: Feb. 17, 2021. CHARGED: March 12, 2021. EIGHTH SUPERSEDING INDICTMENT: June 22, 2022

CHARGES: She is one of eight defendants from the Oath Keepers and is named in seven of nine charges.

  • Conspiracy to obstruct an official proceeding
  • Obstruction of an official proceeding and aiding and abetting
  • Conspiracy to prevent an officer from discharging any duties
  • Destruction of government property and aiding and abetting
  • Disorderly and disruptive conduct in a restricted building or grounds
  • Civil disorder and aiding and abetting
  • Tampering with documents and proceedings and aiding and abetting (she’s the only one of several charged with this). Burned and destroyed evidence in involvement in the attack

STATUS: A trial date is set for Feb. 1.

Tata Aileen Stottlemyer

FROM: Conover

AKA: Tara Aileen Shalvey, charged with Dale Jeremiah “DJ” Shalvey

ARRESTED: Sept. 14, 2021. SUPERSEDING INDICTMENT: Feb. 2, 2022

CHARGES: Charged with her husband, she pleaded guilty on Oct. 3 to one count of the original five she had faced and agreed to cooperate with investigators by allowing them access to her social media accounts:

  • Obstruction of an official proceeding and aiding and abetting

STATUS: She is scheduled to be sentenced on Jan. 20 and could face a prison sentence of 15 to 21 months and fines between $7,500 and $75,000.

William Todd Wilson

FROM:  Newton Grove

CHARGED: May 4, 2022.

CHARGES: He is a member of the Oath Keepers charged with leader Stewart Rhodes on two counts and is said to have helped plan the attack and destroyed his cell phone. He is said to be the first Oath Keeper to enter the Capitol. He pleaded guilty on the day he was charged, May 4.

  • Seditious conspiracy
  • Obstruction of an official proceeding

STATUS: He has agreed to testify in ongoing court cases. No sentencing date has been set. He could face a prison term of between 63 and 78 months and fines of $25,000 to $250,000. He has agreed to $2,000 in restitution and waived various rights.

Matthew Wood (noted in rear) and other rioters engaged in a standoff with officers just outside the Senate Chamber in an area known as the Ohio Clock Corridor. This is included in the DOJ’s court filing. (Win McNamee/Getty Images)

Mark Matthew Wood

FROM:  Reidsville

ARRESTED: March 5, 2021. INDICTED: MARCH 17, 2021. ARRAIGNED: March 23, 2021 (pleaded not guilty to six counts)

CHARGES: Pleaded guilty on May 27, 2022, to:

  • Obstruction of an official proceeding and aiding and abetting
  • Disorderly and disruptive conduct in a restricted building or grounds
  • Disorderly and disruptive conduct in Capitol building

SENTENCED: Nov. 28, 2022, to 3 years of probation, including 12 months of home detention, 100 hours of community service and $2,000 restitution.