(WGHP) — As people search high and low for powder baby formula, state lawmakers advise people not to price gouge and, if they are, for others to report them.

Baby formula has been flying off the shelves nationwide, leaving a lot of parents trying to figure out the best plan for their babies. The recent recall with Abbott Laboratories sent people into a frenzy looking for formula.

“My first-time kind of trip going to the store was the first time that I had cried about something since he’d been born. I was so frustrated trying to find formula,” said Greensboro mother Cyerra Buck.

Experts said the empty shelves were caused by inflation, panic buying from parents, supply chain shortages and the recall.

On Thursday, the Biden administration said they are working with retailers to work on getting the formula back on the shelves quickly.

The administration said it could take up to 10 weeks to get baby formula back on the shelves. In the meantime, they are working to cut red tape laws and urging states to allow more consumers flexibility on the types of formula people can buy with the WIC program.

People on social media have been sharing posts about how to make homemade baby formula which health experts strongly advise against.

They also suggest not changing to regular milk or trying toddler formula in the meantime if your baby is too young.

“It can cause problems with nutritional electrolytes and balances,” said Dr. Kevin Turner of University Hospitals Rainbow Babies & Children’s Hospital.

Since the shelves have been bare, people have been buying bulk and reselling baby formula online.

Attorney Josh Stein said if you see a price that seems too high, whether at the store or on Facebook or other online selling platforms, report it to the office at 1-877-5-NO-SCAM

Health experts said it’s best to contact your family pediatrician to find the best solution for your baby.