DAVIDSON COUNTY, N.C. (WGHP) — FOX8 was told a pilot has died, and emergency crews are on scene after a plane crash involving a tractor-trailer shut down the southbound lanes of I-85 on Wednesday.

  • Scene of fatal plane crash on I-85 in Davidson County (credit: Jerry Bryant Roland)
  • Scene of fatal plane crash on I-85 in Davidson County (credit: Jerry Bryant Roland)
  • Scene of fatal plane crash on I-85 in Davidson County (credit: Jerry Bryant Roland)
  • Scene of fatal plane crash on I-85 in Davidson County (credit: Jerry Bryant Roland)
  • Scene of fatal plane crash on I-85 in Davidson County (credit: Jerry Bryant Roland)
  • Scene of fatal plane crash on I-85 in Davidson County (credit: Jerry Bryant Roland)
  • Scene of fatal plane crash on I-85 in Davidson County (credit: Jerry Bryant Roland)
  • Scene of fatal plane crash on I-85 in Davidson County (credit: Jerry Bryant Roland)

Troopers say the plane was fully engulfed in flames after crashing into a tractor-trailer.

The southbound lanes were closed between exit 91 and exit 88 in Lexington near Cotton Grove Road around 5:30 p.m. and are expected to reopen around 3 a.m., according to the NC Department of Transportation.

Troopers identified the pilot as Raymond John Ackley, 43, of Charlotte. The driver of the tractor-trailer, a 41-year-old Concord man, is in the hospital with non-life-threatening injuries, trooper say.

Troopers are detouring all southbound I-85 traffic starting at the Hwy 64 exit (exit 96). Traffic takes the exit and then gets on Hwy 64 westbound. It then travels five miles through the northern part of Lexington until 64 merges onto Business 85 south (US 29 south.) Business 85 takes traffic around the crash site before it merges back onto main I-85 below the airport.

Troopers say the plane left the Lexington Airport just West of I-85 and experienced a possible mechanical issue.

A 2019 Ford truck was also damaged in the crash.

The Federal Aviation Administration said the plane was a twin-engine Beechcraft Baron.

The FAA and the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) will investigate, and the NTSB will be in charge of the investigation, according to the FAA.