Are you paying more for gas? Yes and no. Check out the trends.

Piedmont Triad News

(WGHP) — The rise in gas prices is both undeniable and unavoidable, but the consumers across the Triad aren’t paying any more than elsewhere in North Carolina or even across the nation.

A survey of prices assembled by GasBuddy, a national watchdog, shows that consumers across the region typically are paying between $3.15 and $3.25 for a gallon of regular unleaded.

The average cost of a gallon nationally is $3.41, but most motorists saw a price of $3.19, which analysts said had not changed from the prior week based on its survey of 150,000 stations.  GasBuddy analyst Patrick De Haan said he thinks that trend will continue as Thanksgiving approaches.

GasBuddy reported that prices on average have risen by 15.1 cents in the past month and $1.31 per gallon in the past year.

There are bargains in the Triad – such as $2.96 to $2.98 at four outlets in Elkin, $2.97 at the Valero in High Point, $2.99 at two locations in Asheboro and four in Thomasville – but typically around Greensboro and Winston-Salem prices trend slightly higher.

The highest found was at a Citgo station on Freeman Mill Road in Greensboro, where you would pay $3.49 a gallon.

Prices in Charlotte are significantly lower, with a minimum of $2.89 and the highest of $3.29. Competition among outlets can be a driving factor in prices, and some of the lowest prices are grouped geographically.

In Raleigh the prices are similar to the Triad’s – from about $2.95 to $ 3.29, with more aggregating at the top end of that range. Asheville and Wilmington also were about the same.

Gas Buddy shows the cheapest outlet in North Carolina is $2.21 per gallon at the Jazz Stop in Morven, which is near Rockingham in the southeastern corner of the state.

The lowest average prices nationally are in Oklahoma ($3.00), Arkansas ($3.06) and Texas ($3.06), and the highest were California ($4.60), Hawaii ($4.27) and Nevada ($3.94).

“Last week saw oil prices briefly fall back under $80 for the first time in weeks. While it wasn’t enough to provide much relief last week, we should see small declines this week in most of the country, thanks to the corresponding drop in wholesale gasoline prices,” De Haan, head of petroleum analysis for GasBuddy, said the company’s blog. “I don’t immediately see a large decline or surge coming in the run up to Thanksgiving, but U.S. gasoline demand does remain strong. Levels are currently rivaling September demand, so we know high prices aren’t significantly curbing consumption.”

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