GREENSBORO, N.C. (WGHP) — Although Greg Hausler graduated from Kansas State University with a degree in Fine Art – painting, in particular – he has spent the bulk of the time since he left there in the corporate world, albeit with a hand in artsy stuff like graphics.

But like many artists, the urge to create was always there. One day, a couple of years ago, as he and his wife, Diana, were doing some routine cleaning of their home in Greensboro, they came across the few pieces he’d done in the years since school.

“I saw the raw talent, and his passion for art,” Diana said of the first time she laid eyes on some of Greg’s work. “He just needed a place to do it in. It can’t be in the house because my sewing stuff is here.”

She’s joking. Kind of. Diana is an artist herself, doing a particular style of quilting, and she does now see that, to a degree, she and Greg are kindred souls as artists.

“I think so. In the beginning, I didn’t think that way. I just thought we were two quirky people getting together,” she said.

With Diana’s encouragement, Greg has produced a lot of pieces over the last couple of years.

“I liken some of what’s going on in my life kind of to the theme of Field of Dreams – build it and they will come,” Greg said.

And they did – via the internet. Greg got a message from Milos Micovic saying that there is an art show in Belgrade, Serbia, that Greg should apply to be part of. At first, Greg and Diana thought it was a scam but they did their research and realized it was real. And Greg’s art seems perfect for a modern show since he calls himself “an abstract distractionist.”

“I say ‘abstract’ because it’s not representational, and I say ‘distractionist’ because all forms of entertainment are some form of distraction,” he said. “It takes you away from – hopefully, in a pleasant way – from your own reality which is what you want out of entertainment.”

What sets Greg’s work apart, among other things, is his use of textiles, often finished pieces of clothing, in his work. There are challenges in doing work that’s non-traditional.

“One of the toughest things is knowing how to start and knowing how to finish,” Greg said. “You get to a point where you do something and you stand back, you do something and you stand back, and when you find that you’re standing back more than you’re doing something then you’re probably done.”

See how he came to use textiles in his work and what became of the invitation to show his art in Europe, in this edition of the Buckley Report.

To see more of his work, visit the Wonky Star Studios YouTube channel and the Wonky Star Studios Facebook page.