FILE – Robert Morse appears at the live read and series finale of “Mad Men” held in Los Angeles on May 17, 2015. Morse, who won a Tony Award as a hilariously brash corporate climber in “How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying” and a second one a generation later as the brilliant, troubled Truman Capote in “Tru,” died peacefully at his home on Wednesday, April 20, at the age of 90. (Photo by Richard Shotwell/Invision/AP, File)

NEW YORK, N.Y. (WGHP) – Robert Morse, the famed Broadway star who danced himself into the sunset as an apparition in his last scene on “Mad Men,” died Thursday at age 90, Variety has reported.

The Associated Press reported that Morse died at his home Wednesday after a brief illness, said David Shaul of BRS/Gage Talent Agency.

Morse built his legend as the star of “How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying” on Broadway in 1962 and later appeared in the movie version of the musical. He went on to win multiple Tony Awards and an Emmy Award for an “American Playhouse” production of another of his award-winning Broadway roles as Truman Capote.

IMBD lists Morse as having 75 acting credits in movies and TV, most recently as Santa Claus in “Teen Titans Go!,” a TV series that ran from 2015 to 2021. He also played author Dominick Dunne in the “American Crime Story” serial “The Verdict” in 2016.

FILE – Tony Award winners, from left to right, James Naughton, best actor in “City of Angels,” Maggie Smith, best actress for “Lettice and Lovage,” Tyne Daly, best actress for “Gypsy,” and Robert Morse, best actor for “Iru” pose with their trophies in New York on June 3, 1990. Morse, who won a Tony Award as a hilariously brash corporate climber in “How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying” and a second one a generation later as the brilliant, troubled Truman Capote in “Tru,” died peacefully at his home on Wednesday, April 20, at the age of 90. (AP Photo/Richard Drew, File)

But his most significant late-in-life role was as the iconoclastic and odd Bertram Cooper, a founding owner of the advertising firm “Sterling Cooper” that was at the heart of the “Mad Men” series on AMC from 2007 to 2015.

Cooper was known for his high-minded perceptions of literature, art, politics and his business. He made visitors to his office remove their shoes and portrayed a driving force for the expansion of the advertising business on Madison Avenue in the 1960s.

Matthew Weiner, left, and Robert Morse arrive at AMC’s Black & Red Ball to celebrate the final episodes of “Mad Men” at Dorothy Chandler Pavilion on Wednesday, March 25, 2015, in Los Angeles. (Photo by Todd Williamson/Invision for AMC/AP Images)

He was nominated and won numerous Emmy and other acting awards as both an individual and cast member for “Mad Men” and in 2010 won a Gold Derby Award for Drama Guest Actor in 2007. “Mad Men” won numerous awards as a series, too.

Morse’s last scene was in the final season of “Mad Men,” after his character had died suddenly. He appeared in a song-and-dance performance with office workers of “The Best Things in Life Are Free” for an audience of one, series creative icon Donald Draper (played by Jon Hamm).

“The opportunity to shine in the spotlight that [series developer] Matt Weiner gave me — it was an absolute love letter. Christmas and New Year’s, all rolled into one,” Morse told The New York Times.

Rich Sommer, who played Harry Crane, one of the leading characters in “Mad Men,” wrote this in a tweet on Thursday: “Just about every person working at MM came down to watch him do this. We were all a mess. It was beautiful and strange, and so was he. RIP Bobby.”