Contact: Bob.Buckley@wghp.com

Bob always knew he was meant to live in North Carolina, it just took him a while to get here. He was born and raised in Chicago and went to the University of Missouri for Journalism school. After working in the “real world” for a year, he went back for his graduate degree in broadcast journalism and two days after graduating, found himself driving to North Carolina for a job as a sportscaster in Greenville. From there, he went to Washington State to be a sportscaster for a couple of years, before finding his way back to the Piedmont and making the switch to covering news.

You can see most of Bob’s work on the FOX8 10:00 News, and sometimes on our other newscasts. You’ll also see Bob filling in as an anchor occasionally. Politics, philosophy and literature are among his favorite subjects to read and discuss, when he’s not playing soccer or spending time with his wife, Jean-Marie, and their 4 children.


Recent Articles
  • Danville city leaders see salvation in the idea of a casino

    DANVILLE, Va. — There are so many ways you can tie the industries that built so many cities and towns in our area to their more recent fates. Danville, Virginia, is one of them. Dan River Inc. was a major textile company whose White Mill dominates the riverfront. To this day, though, it hasn’t produced any fabric in years. And the southern end of town is filled with old tobacco warehouses that are looking for new life. “I won’t deny […]

  • Local woman talks about HIV diagnosis, treating it to where it was ‘undetectable’

    WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. — We all have those nagging colds and infections, especially when we’re under stress. And Nicole Dye was under a lot of stress, seven years ago. “My husband died in March of 2012,” Dye said. “Unrelated, that spring I had a sinus infection for, like, three months. I had to go on two rounds of antibiotics, it was very hard to get rid of. And then, the end of that summer I got the shingles.” Dye never waits […]

  • Local project helps students understand the history of slavery in North Carolina

    Amid all the challenges of the modern world, it’s sometimes difficult to remember how far we’ve come. As a former history major at Wake Forest University and history teacher, John Williams tries to show the reality of history to his students at McMichael High School, where he’s principal. “So many times, students don’t realize that there are slave properties very close to where they live,” Williams told FOX8 at Old Salem. “The slave cabin we went to today was only […]

  • Cochlear ear implants help elderly people lead a more fulfilling life

    DAVIDSON COUNTY, N.C. — “I swore I’m on the verge of retiring,” said Jack Frank, as he climbed on top of his large, industrial earth-moving machine. He’s on the land he owns in the south part of Davidson County. At 94-years-of-old, he’s grading some of the open spaces. Jack has been on the move during his entire retirement He often speaks at schools and conferences about his life experiences. As a member of the Lions Club, he has worked on […]

  • 90-year-old man still selling homes after starting new career in NC at 73

    Just about the time most people look to retire, Dick Barnes began his career. Well, his second career. His first was back in his home state of Indiana, where he worked in sales for a company called, Sun Metal, a company that made things like bicycle wheel rims and household items. “It was the chance of a lifetime for me, because I grew up there,” Barnes said of Sun, the company at which he spent nearly three decades. When he […]

  • Reynolds Building in downtown Winston-Salem is rich with history

    WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. — For nearly a century – 90 years, to be precise – a name and the building it is on have dominated the city of Winston-Salem. RJ Reynolds was, arguably, the most significant figure to ever grace the city. So, when he died from pancreatic cancer in 1918, his company and the men who came to run it wanted to pay homage to him somehow. Adding a 122nd building that was bigger than anything else in town seemed […]

  • World War II D-Day veterans honored for 75th anniversary

    WELCOME, N.C. — Even the man planning the largest amphibious assault in history wasn’t sure it would work. Gen. Dwight D. Eisenhower was the Supreme Commander of Allied Forces in Europe. The Allies knew they had to attack the Germans on the continent and drive into Germany to force a surrender. So, in the early morning hours of June 6, 1944, nearly 12,000 aircraft and 7,000 ships began moving more than 150,000 men and their munitions across the English Channel. […]

  • Family of Greensboro teen with amnesia talks about trip to Texas for new treatment – ‘Caitlin Can’t Remember’ episode 15

    GREENSBORO, N.C. — After 18 months, the Littles were frustrated. “We could go on and on and on about how many doctors wasted our time, wasted Caitlin’s time. ‘Sure, bring her down. We’ll take a look at her,’ when they have no medically-recommended approved methods of dealing with this,” said Chris Little, Caitlin’s father. Caitlin suffered a traumatic brain injury when she was accidentally hit on the head by a teammate at cross country practice for Southeast Guilford High School […]

  • Greensboro teen with amnesia goes on ‘The Dr. Oz Show’ – ‘Caitlin Can’t Remember’ episode 14

    GREENSBORO, N.C. — “I think she liked the experience,” her mom says, with a smile. “The experience” was Caitlin Little’s first plane ride — to New York City to be on “The Dr. Oz Show.” Dr. Oz and his staff had seen FOX8’s reports and wanted to do something similar for his show, so they hired a photographer to come to the Littles’ home and shoot video very similar to what FOX8 has done over the last few months. “’Just […]

  • Green Beret with terminal cancer working to change law on malpractice lawsuits

    He had no problem stepping forward to defend his country. Richard Stayskal volunteered and became a Marine Corps sniper – even took an enemy bullet to the chest while deployed – but survived. He later became a Green Beret and, in 2017, when he wasn’t feeling well, he went to the army hospital at Fort Bragg, where he is stationed. They did a CT scan but said he looked fine and sent him home. But he continued to feel ill […]

  • Historians preserve history of North Carolina communities’ battle against polio

    In 1944, just weeks after the most famous polio victim in America, President Franklin Roosevelt, died, a polio epidemic broke out in Hickory that lead to a massive response. The city built an ad hoc hospital and brought in experts from Harvard and Johns Hopkins to quell the disease – it worked. Four years later, Guilford County had to fight its own battle against the disease. “In 1948, when the polio epidemic hit, Guilford County came together and raised about […]

  • State program has volunteers transcribing documents of old letters and documents

    It’s always nice when your work fascinates you. “All of these collections, to me, are ‘wow’ and interesting collections,” says North Carolina state archivist, Sarah Koonts. And, now, Sarah and her team are asking you to come on board. The state has a program called, “Transcribe NC,” in which volunteers help transcribe documents in their collection. The transcriptions of old letters and documents – often written in a form of cursive that some younger people, today, can’t decipher – helps […]

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