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Man implants Tesla key into hand to unlock car with 1 swipe

Data pix.

SPRINGVILLE, Utah -- A Utah man has put some technology under his skin that lets him unlock his Tesla with just a wave of his hand, KSTU reports.

And that's not all he can do with the four chips in his hands.

Ben Workman is one of a few people around the world who are turning to cybernetic implants.

Simply speaking, they're different kinds of computer chips that let you do different things.

With his, Workman can unlock his car, unlock doors at work, log on and off of his computer and share contact information, using the same tech that's used for Apple Pay and Google Pay.

You may be wondering what inspired someone to do something like this. For Workman, it's pretty simple.

"In all reality, it was experimentation and curiosity," Workman told KSTU.

The process to get the chips into Workman's hands wasn't as simple as his motivation though.

"On the first two, I actually didn't have anyone. I tried going to a veterinarian, a doctor, a piercing studio, no one would do it," he said.

Workman ended up getting a family member to do it for him.

"To get them in, they come in syringes, just place them under the skin and pop the tags out, except the Tesla key," he said.

The Tesla key required a bit more work, so he managed to convince a piercing studio to help him, but they weren't too keen on the idea at first.

"But the piercing studio is an interesting one. I figured that they would be fine with it but they took one look at the thing I had in my hands and they said, 'Noooo,'" he said.

Workman also has a magnet in his left hand.

"Which is literally just a magnet. It doesn't have any interesting functionality besides magic tricks and fun stuff," he said.

Next up for Workman, he wants to put a chip in his hand that lets him pay for things without a credit card or phone.

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