Organ donation saves lives across Piedmont Triad

Data pix.

WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. -- It's been less than a week since 11-year-old Noah Chambers was hit by a car at a trunk-or-treat event.

Now his organs are preparing to go to seven different people and change their lives.

There are over 3,000 people in North Carolina on the donor waiting list.

FOX8 spoke with a man who was taken off that list this year.

"It absolutely changed my life. Absolutely," Joshua Wolfe said.

He took a picture of himself at Wake Forest Baptist Hospital just moments before receiving a brand new kidney.

"Last year, I was on dialysis. I had been on dialysis for over five years," Wolfe said.

His life changed five months ago.

"There were three or four calls I would get. You never really know when you're going to get that call," Wolfe said. "They were all mismatches up until I got the one in April. I was so relieved it happened."

He had a second chance at life.

"I get to be around [my family] for another Christmas, holidays, Thanksgiving, birthdays. I get to spend time with family and friends. This is a blessing," Wolfe said.

While grateful, he knows it comes at a great cost.

"I try not to take it for granted. I know the decision meant something to [donors' families] so that I could continue to live," Wolfe said.

But that's what gets a lot of families through tough times.

"We've had a lot of donors' families say in this tragedy if I didn't have a donation to hang on to, it would just be a tragedy that nothing came out of," said Beth Hinesley, who works at Carolina Donor Services.

CDS is one of two organ procurement organizations in the state.

She says there are just not enough donors, and is hoping people realize how much impact they can have on others even after death.

"[One] person could save or heal the lives of up to 75 people with tissue donations," Hinesley said. "It's making a decision on drivers' licenses in North Carolina that can help so many people."

Notice: you are using an outdated browser. Microsoft does not recommend using IE as your default browser. Some features on this website, like video and images, might not work properly. For the best experience, please upgrade your browser.