Local school districts constantly working to improve school safety

GREENSBORO, N.C. -- School safety is a main topic of conversation parents are having with their children more often these days.

Local schools are doing drills and are constantly looking for ways to improve security on campuses.

It all comes down to the millions of dollars schools are spending to improve surveillance systems and create new barriers to block intruders.

Guilford County Schools has the "One Card" to get in and out of buildings.

Cameras are rolling at Winston-Salem/Forsyth County Schools, and in Randolph and Davidson County Schools, glass enclosures limit how far you can get into the building.

"We constantly need to review our plans and look at other school districts in terms of what security measures they have," said Scott McCully, chief operating officer of Guilford County Schools.

He admits there are older schools in the district, but explains they work every day to improve safety.

"We've invested quite a bit of time and money into our safety and security measures," McCully said.

How much money? More than $10 million. It'll go towards adding buzzers on every outside door, upgrading camera systems and helping possibly invest in special gun shot detection software inside Guilford County School.

"Leveraging technology to be able to assist us in keeping our schools safe and secure is a way of the future," McCully said.

While technology is a tactic, having a secure building is what other school districts are prioritizing.

Winston-Salem/Forsyth County Schools is asking for more than $4 million for school resource officers and night security.

Davidson County Schools wants more than $300,000 to add glass enclosures on the front of all schools, with intercom entries.

Randolph County Schools have $145,000 to spend on controlling access to its buildings.

All the school districts are also using drills and training methods to make kids feel secure.

"We want students to be informed, but at the same time we don't want them to be scared or overly cautious," McCully said.

He says in order to help students say something when they see something, Guilford County Schools is looking at different apps on their phones to allow a safe place for students to share information.

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