Winston-Salem/Forsyth County Schools names interim superintendent

Dr. Kenneth Simington

WINSTON-SALEM. N.C. — The Winston-Salem/Forsyth County Schools Board of Education has approved a contract to hire Dr. Kenneth Simington as interim superintendent while the board begins the search for Dr. Beverly Emory’s permanent replacement, the school system said in a news release.

Emory announced her resignation as WSFCS superintendent on Feb. 8. She will begin working as the director of district and regional support with the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction in May.

Simington spent most of his more than 30 years in education with Winston-Salem/Forsyth County Schools.

Most recently, he has served as deputy superintendent since 2016. Prior to that role, he served as the assistant superintendent for instructional and student services and the chief academic officer, according to the school system.

Simington has been in multiple roles during his tenure, starting as a school counselor. He has a Bachelor of Arts in psychology and a Master’s of Education degree from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He has his Doctor of Philosophy in counseling from the University of North Carolina at Greensboro.

He attended Carver High School and graduated from East Forsyth High School.

“I am thankful to the Winston-Salem/Forsyth County Schools Board of Education for the opportunity to serve during this time,” Simington said. “I look forward to working with all of our students, families, teachers, administrators, staff, and the community. It is important that the district stays focused on the work ahead for the best outcomes for our students.”

According to the contract approved by the board Tuesday night, Simington’s first official day will be March 1. As of that date, Emory will move into a consultative role to help during the transition until her resignation becomes effective on May 5.

In the coming weeks, the board plans to begin working on the selection process and timeline for hiring a permanent replacement, the school system said. Those options will likely include consultation with the North Carolina School Board Association and other outside consultants whose role will be to aid in a national search.

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