Grant helps Humane Society of the Piedmont become ‘a better clinic’

GREENSBORO, N.C. — Every day, thousands of animals are at risk of being euthanized because shelters don’t have enough room to keep them.

Locally, The Humane Society of the Piedmont works to reduce the number of animals in shelters by addressing animal overpopulation.

“We performed 6,239 spay or neuter surgeries in 2018. That's a lot, and that's going to prevent a lot of animals from ending up at the shelter,” Executive Director Erin Stratford Owens said.

Jan Grafton worked at the Humane Society of the Piedmont about eight years ago.

She now runs her own animal rescue – Jan’s Animal Rescue.

Grafton says it’s difficult to see so many animals in need and not be able to help them all.

She was recently contacted about a dog, Norma Ray, who was in a shelter in Wilson County.

“She's a sweet dog, and just no room — she would have been euthanized the next day if we wouldn’t have taken her and that's the case so many times,” Grafton said.

Norma Ray’s story is an example of why the Humane Society of the Piedmont is doing more to invest in its future.

It recently received a capacity building grant from the Community Foundation of Greater Greensboro.

The money covered a clinic consultation with the ASPCA Spay-Neuter Alliance formerly known as the Humane Alliance.

“We had two doctors from the Humane Alliance come to our facility for a day-and-a-half and they observed and they met with the entire staff, and we have changed how we do things in our clinic because of that experience,” Stratford Owens said.

“Because of the grant from the Community Foundation of Greater Greensboro, we're a better clinic, and we're growing, and we'll do more surgeries this year — certainly.”

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