Severe Thunderstorm Warning issued for parts of the Piedmont

GoFundMe to build Trump’s border wall raises more than $3 million in 3 days

With political parties at an impasse over the billions of dollars necessary to fund President Trump’s proposed border wall, a Florida veteran decided to launch a GoFundMe campaign – in just three days donations surpassed the $3.1 million mark, as of Thursday.

Brian Kolfage, 37, created the fundraiser titled “We The People Will Fund The Wall,” which has a $1 billion goal.

Kolfage is a senior airman who lost three limbs while while fighting  in Iraq in 2004, according to his website. He now works as a motivational speaker and shared his verified Facebook page in the campaign’s description to verify his identity.

“As a veteran who has given so much, 3 limbs, I feel deeply invested to this nation to ensure future generations have everything we have today,” Kolfage wrote. “It’s up to Americans to help out and pitch in to get this project rolling.”

Kolfage claims he says he has been contacted by the Trump Administration, and has “very high level contacts already helping.”

With shutdown looming, a bill passes

The Senate passed a stop-gap spending bill on Wednesday night in an effort to keep the government funded and prevent a partial shutdown at the end of the week.

A shutdown hasn’t been averted just yet: The measure will still need to be approved by the House of Representatives and signed by President Donald Trump before it can take effect.

But the Senate’s passage of the short-term measure brings Washington one step closer to staving off a shutdown of some key federal agencies, set to expire at midnight on Friday, just days before Christmas.

Republicans and Democrats on Capitol Hill have made clear they don’t want a shutdown, but had been at an impasse over the President’s demand for $5 billion in funding for his long-promised wall at the US-Mexico border.

Democrats have made clear that figure is a non-starter for them and any spending bill would need at least some Democratic votes to pass in the Senate.

Of course, no spending measure is final until the President signs it.

But on Tuesday, the White House appeared to step away from the brink of a shutdown.

White House press secretary Sarah Sanders said Tuesday morning during an interview with Fox News that, “We have other ways that we can get to that $5 billion (for a border wall).”

Members of the conservative House Freedom Caucus and other conservative allies of the President plan to give brief speeches on the House floor Wednesday night, however, urging Trump not to abandon his quest for border wall funding.

They include: Mark Meadows of North Carolina, Jim Jordan of Ohio, Paul Gosar of Arizona, Steve Pearce of New Mexico, Jody Hice of Georgia, Ralph Norman of South Carolina, Andy Biggs of Arizona and Morgan Griffith of Virginia.

Despite opposition from the Freedom Caucus, however, the House should still have the votes to still pass the continuing resolution, assuming most, if not all, Democrats support it, since it has Pelosi’s blessing.

But even as members of the Freedom Caucus are poised to urge Trump not to abandon his quest for border wall funding, White House officials say it’s likely the President will do just that — and sign a short-term spending bill to avert a partial government shutdown.

The President has been unusually quiet about the issue on Wednesday, holding his tongue as some conservative commentators and lawmakers blast him for abandoning his commitment.

But two White House aides said the President likely has no choice but to sign a temporary funding measure to keep the government open until February 8. The aides say the White House is intentionally not signaling what Trump will do, but there does not appear to be talk inside the West Wing of blocking it.

White House counselor Kellyanne Conway hinted earlier that Trump is leaning this way when she told reporters at the White House the President will “take a look at” the continuing resolution, though she attempted to frame any punt as something other than a concession from the White House.

All this comes a week after the President said he’d be “proud” to shut down the government, so delaying the funding fight until Democrats retake the House next year is a fairly clear concession — and a risky one. Although Republicans clearly don’t have the votes to support his request.

Notice: you are using an outdated browser. Microsoft does not recommend using IE as your default browser. Some features on this website, like video and images, might not work properly. For the best experience, please upgrade your browser.