Davidson County school system responds after W-2 forms compromised

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DAVIDSON COUNTY, N.C. – The superintendent of Davidson County Schools released a statement Thursday about the information breach that’s compromising employee information.

Wednesday night, school employees received a memo stating that their W-2 forms were sent out in response to a phony email request from someone pretending to be the school superintendent.

Names, address and social security numbers are some of the things compromised.

“I know this is a stressful time for you and your family and I apologize to everyone dealing with this situation,” said Lory Morow, the Davidson County School superintendent. “Please know that we are working diligently to address this error and we are currently coordinating with our insurance carrier to set up credit monitoring services and a call center to support employees.”

Teachers we spoke to complained they weren’t given resources fast enough, a promised call center isn’t up and running yet.

Teachers also say they haven’t been given the time to either complete their taxes or make sure the IRS and North Carolina Department of Revenue know potentially fake returns could be filed in their name. One teacher says no face-to-face communication has taken place with school leaders.

Frank Bibus, a district manager at Jackson Hewitt Tax Service, says his office in Lexington has already received calls from concerned staff.

”There is a possibility that someone has already used their number,” Bibus said. “If they use your number you can't use your number as well. You know there's a mix-up or theft.”

Bibus urges anyone with compromised information to get their taxes done as soon as possible.

In its statement, the school system says to its knowledge they have no direct evidence of actual or attempted misuse of the personal information that was compromised.

Local law enforcement, the IRS and the FBI are among the agencies trying to figure out why this happened and who might have gotten their hands on that W-2 information.

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