Local residents react to E. coli being found in water supply

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JAMESTOWN, N.C. – People who live on or near Sherry Court in Jamestown are closely following the city of High Point’s orders to boil any water that may be consumed like drinking water or water used to cook.

"I've been boiling water," said Dennis Kendrick who lives in Jamestown.

"I'm in the house now boiling water and trying to get prepared as best as possible," said Debbie Olson, a Jamestown resident.

This week, High Point city officials say two water samples taken from a faucet from a private water line on Sherry Court tested positive for E. coli.

People in High Point and Jamestown got a notice Friday afternoon to boil any water that may be ingested.

"If you brush your teeth, probably boil the water,” said Terry Houk, High Point public services director. “If you cook, boil the water."

Some were shocked to find out water from their own neighborhood may be unsafe.

"I didn't know all this was happening in my neighborhood,” said Pamela Ingram, who lives in Jamestown. “I stopped at the grocery store and saw everyone with these shopping carts full of water and I was like ‘what's going on?’"

Some made quick changes to simple things like cooking dinner.

"I've got something cooking in the microwave, just something simple and quick," Olson said.

Restaurants have also had to make some quick adjustments.

Southern Roots in Jamestown says on one of their busiest nights, they've had to buy bottled water and make other changes.

"We immediately took action because you couldn't buy ice here,” said Lisa Howley, the restaurant’s owner. “You had to go to Greensboro to buy ice. We went to Thomasville to buy ice. So, it's been a long day."

The city will be flushing fire hydrants in High Point and Jamestown throughout the weekend to try to clear any possible E. coli or other bacteria.

City crews also placed temporary piping along Sherry Court.

The goal is to isolate the area’s water system where the samples of E. coli were found, according to Houk.