Weather closings and delays

Families raise money for rescue gear for Madison-Rockingham Rescue Squad

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ROCKINGHAM COUNTY, N.C -- Lois Line says more than two years after her son's death, she still remembers the pain of waiting for rescue crews to find his body.

"We miss Jacob every single day," Line said. "You don't understand the agony until you're in it."

Jacob Line and his friend James Bohensteil drowned during a fishing trip at Belews Lake in April 2014.

It took 17 days for rescue crews to find Bohensteil’s body and 65 days to find Jacob's body.

"It's just the waiting and the hoping that it's not really what it is, that he's not really drowned in that lake," Lois said.

It’s a pain the family of James Bateman, another boater who went missing on the lake Memorial Day weekend, is now feeling.

Bateman was reported missing more than 70 days ago.

His body still hasn't been found.

The families and friends of Line, Bohensteil and Bateman have been raising money to prevent other families from going through the same thing.

"I want to make it better for the next family," Line said.

They raised about $25,000 to help the Madison-Rockingham Rescue Squad buy a Sea Scan Arc Explorer, high definition sonar equipment that can take pictures up to 300 feet wide.

"It literally swims or flies through the water," said Rusty Gray, chief of the rescue squad.

Pictures taken underwater are sent to a computer for rescue teams to analyze.

"It really has the ability to produce crystal clear images," he said.

Gray says the high-tech gear will help first responders save time.

Line hopes it will also save other families from the pain of waiting.

"If it's going to lessen it for even a minute a day for some other family, it is worth every penny we raised," Line said.

Gray says the closest agency with similar underwater sonar gear is in Charlotte.

The Sea Scan Arc Explorer costs $40,000.

The rescue squad used federal grants and private donations to come up with the rest of the money for the equipment.