Feeling sad or blue? It could be what you’re eating

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WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. -- "These are such the treat for me, really. I'd choose these almost any day over chips or sweets," laughs Brittany Keith, as she points to the green beans at the expansive and always fresh food selections at the Piedmont Triad Farmers Market. "Sprinkle with a little olive oil and sea salt. They are wonderful!"

Keith is a big believer in an ever growing field called nutritional psychiatry, the idea that what we eat has a huge impact on our mood and how we feel.

"Even just one giant bad-for-you meal can disrupt the bacteria in your gut, which leads to inflammation, obesity, mood issues, everything. How you eat is so important for how you feel," said Novant Health's Dr. Gwen Wigand-Bolling. "You eat simple carbs and your insulin shoots up. That quick sugar fix will make you feel bad later on."

Wigand-Bolling encourages her patients to give themselves three weeks of eating clean, with lean protein, fruits and vegetables, to see how much better they can feel.

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