Ways to relieve knee pain

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Dealing with “bad knees” can come with a pain that’s unbearable at times.

Joyce Mabe says on a scale of one to 10 -- her pain was at its peak.

"It was a 10. It got really bad,” she said.

After having arthroscopic surgery, she was able to gain a new sense of mobility.

“Stepping up, it's a world of difference from before because before I couldn't hardly do it without help,” she said.

Surgery is an option in many cases, but doctors say that’s not the way most people find relief.

“A large percentage of patients that we see with knee pain do not need surgery,” Dr. Slade Moore, an orthopedic surgeon with Novant Health Orthopedics & Sports Medicine, said.

Moore explains that knee pain can be related to multiple factors including previous injuries and genetics, but says the most common knee related issue is osteoarthritis.

Overdoing it during exercise can lead to overuse injuries, but low-impact exercise such as swimming, biking, or walking is not something you should stop doing when experiencing knee problems.

“If you do have arthritis, some level of exercise and activity is actually going to be beneficial,” Moore said.

Anti-inflammatory medicines and physical therapy to strengthen muscles around joints are options other than surgery.

Weight loss can also relieve a significant amount of knee pain.

“One pound of weight gain or loss affects the stress on the joint four pounds, so a ten pound weight loss is taking 40 pounds of stress off the joint," Moore said.

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