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Jeb Bush ‘slow jams’ the news with Jimmy Fallon

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Republican presidential candidate Jeb Bush is checking off his presidential to-do list now that he’s officially in the race, and that includes “slow jamming” the news with Jimmy Fallon.

As Bush rattled off his talking points on NBC’s “Tonight Show,” Fallon and The Roots’ Tariq Trotter, who is better known as “Black Thought,” responded in song and their commentary was heavily laced with sexual innuendos.

“I thought long and hard about this decision and after careful consideration I determined that now is the right time to to launch my campaign for the Republican nomination,” Bush said.

Fallon responded with a long, drawn out “Ohhh yeah!” and added “The governor fought long and hard about joining the GOP race after months of being a total caucus tease. Jeb Finally made up his mind and quit beating around the bush,” in a breathy, deepening voice.

“Jeb really wants to get in the White House but not as bad as Obama wants out,” Black Thought sang, prompting applause form the audience.

Throughout the appearance, Bush was called many things, including “Little Jebby,” “Jebadiah” and “Governor Pitbull.”

“He went to Miami, now he’s gone. His nickname is the white Lebron,” Black Thought sang.

In slow jam fashion, Fallon asked Bush this hard hitting question: “Now that we’re talking about the issues, where do you stand on immigration?”

“Well Jimmy, we’re a nation of immigrants and I believe everyone should have the chance to achieve the American dream,” Bush said, following his answer up with a Spanish translation for “all your Spanish speaking viewers.”

“Whoa Whoa whoa, hold the teléfono!” Fallon fired off. “I know you just got back from Miami but I didn’t think I was interviewing Governor Pitbull.”

Bush is not the first to “slow jam the news” with Fallon. Others before him include former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney, New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie and President Barack Obama.

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