Exotic spider-like crickets now common in Piedmont Triad homes

This is an archived article and the information in the article may be outdated. Please look at the time stamp on the story to see when it was last updated.

A study released by researchers at North Carolina State University shows Asian camel crickets are now common in homes across the United States.

Pest control experts in the Piedmont Triad say the exotic insects tend to live in dark, damp spaces. They do not bite or sting, but they leave behind a mess.

“They're honestly very creepy. They jump very far; they don't have a lot of control over where they're jumping or what they're jumping toward. They look a lot like spiders and they move like spiders, except when they're jumping,” said Chase Hazelwood, with Go-Forth Pest Control.

The NC State study says Asian camel crickets are now more common than native crickets. The insects are scavengers, so they eat things like fungus and other insects.

Pest Control companies can take care of cricket infestations, but there are also some easy ways to take care of the problem yourself with glue boards or insect bait.

“If you can get one caught on [a glue board], it will send out pheromone signals that will attract other camel crickets to the glue board as well. It's a very simple technique,” said Hazelwood.

Other tricks include keeping crawl space vents open and keeping dark spaces in the house clean and dry.

Notice: you are using an outdated browser. Microsoft does not recommend using IE as your default browser. Some features on this website, like video and images, might not work properly. For the best experience, please upgrade your browser.