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Kutcher, Walmart Face Off on Twitter over Canton food drive

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Ashton Kutcher

CANTON, Ohio —  Actor/producer Ashton Kutcher has gotten into a spat with Walmart on Twitter.

It was after he learned of a food drive for workers at the Canton Walmart location.

It was reported earlier this week that employees at the store were collecting food for themselves, and encouraged to place donated items in bins to help provide Thanksgiving meals to other associates in need.

Kutcher tweeted the following in reaction to the story:

Walmart tweeted back:

The following exchange ensued:

2 comments

  • JT

    As much as I hate to say this, Kutcher is right (and I am no Ashton Kutcher fan). What does it say when a corporate entity like Wal Mart has a canned food drive in its’ stores to feed its workers? And they make money off of it–you know that the employees that are buying canned food to help feed their coworkers are buying the generic, Wal Mart brand canned food. So, a company that pays its workers so little that the other workers have to buy the Wal Mart brand to help feed other workers pay to buy the store brand. And Wal Mart makes money TWICE–once off of not paying a competitive rate, and once again when workers buy store brand food to feed their colleagues. And WallyWorld ain’t the only ones confessing that they don’t pay well enough to live on–McDonalds is telling their employees how to get on Medicaid and other government assistance programs. Essentially, they’ve created a slave class that they can exploit for a profit margin. Ah, Corporate Capitalism–gotta love it…if you are CEO of Wal Mart of McDonalds, that is.

  • WR

    You are on point JT. Walmart is only one of many US corporations that gather billions in profits to enrich the private few while leaving the public to help provide any semblance of a middle-class life for their lowest-level workers

Comments are closed.

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