Foreclosure filings fall statewide, rise in Forsyth

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FORSYTH COUNTY, N.C. — September foreclosure filings in North Carolina fell 26.1 percent to 2,017 compared with September 2012, RealtyTrac Inc. said in a report timed for release Thursday. Filings were down 14.6 percent compared with August.

The Winston-Salem metropolitan statistical area had 339 foreclosure filings in September, up 29.4 percent from a year ago and up 58.4 percent from August. The MSA consists of Davie, Forsyth, Stokes and Yadkin counties. Forsyth had 330 of the filings.

Davidson County was grafted into the Winston-Salem MSA by a federal agency in February, but its foreclosure filings have not been added yet to the RealtyTrac data.

Filings in the Greensboro-High Point MSA were up 14.4 percent to 310 compared with a year ago, and up 53.5 percent from August. Filings in the Raleigh-Cary MSA were up 97.1 percent to 270 compared with a year ago, but down 38.2 percent from August.

Filings in the Charlotte-Gastonia-Concord MSA were down 46.4 percent to 708 compared with a year ago, and down 27.9 percent from August. Filings in the Durham MSA were down 76.7 percent to 33 compared with a year ago, and down 40 percent from August.

“The September and third-quarter foreclosure numbers show a housing market that is haltingly returning to health,” said Daren Blomquist, vice president at RealtyTrac.

“While millions of distressed homeowners have been pulled back from the precipice by foreclosure prevention programs over the past several years, once those programs expire or are exhausted, a percentage of these troubled homeowners are still susceptible to falling into foreclosure. In addition even slight economic downturns at the local or regional level can push these homeowners hanging on by a thread over the edge.”

By Richard Craver/Winston-Salem Journal

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