New North Korean video shows imagined attack on Washington

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SEOUL, South Korea (CNN) -- A new North Korean propaganda video shows images of what appears to be an imagined missile attack on U.S. government buildings in Washington, including the White House and the Capitol.

The roughly 4-minute video was posted Monday in the YouTube channel of the North Korean government website Uriminzokkiri.

It carries a montage of clips of different weapons, including artillery guns firing and large missiles on display at military parades.

Just before the 3-minute mark, it cuts to footage of target sights honing in on the White House and then a simulated sequence of the Capitol's dome exploding.

The video's release comes amid spiking tensions between Pyongyang and Washington after the U.N. Security Council voted to impose tougher sanctions on North Korea following its latest nuclear test last month.

In a slew of angry rhetoric in response to the U.N. vote, North Korea has threatened to carry out a pre-emptive nuclear attack on the United States and South Korea and said it was nullifying the armistice agreement that stopped the Korean War in 1953.

Although analysts and U.S. officials say they don't believe North Korea is in a position to strike the United States at the moment, Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel last week announced plans to deploy additional ground-based missile interceptors on the West Coast as part of efforts to enhance the nation's ability to defend itself from attack.

This isn't the first time a North Korean propaganda video has evoked the prospect of an attack on the United States.

A video posted on YouTube last month, before the North carried out its most recent underground nuclear test, depicted a city resembling New York with its skyscrapers on fire.

That video was subsequently removed after the videogame maker Activision said those scenes had been lifted from its top-selling game "Call of Duty."

This article was written by CNN's K.J. Kwon and Jethro Mullen. CNN's K.J. Kwon reported from Seoul, and Jethro Mullen reported and wrote from Hong Kong.  TM & © 2012 Cable News Network, Inc., a Time Warner Company. All rights reserved.

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