This summer is ‘what global warming looks like,’ scientists say

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Giovanny Alvarez, a letter carrier for the U.S. Postal Service, leaves after delivering mail to a residence in Washington, Monday, July 2, 2012, damaged by the powerful storm that swept through the region Friday. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

Giovanny Alvarez, a letter carrier for the U.S. Postal Service, leaves after delivering mail to a residence in Washington, Monday, July 2, 2012, damaged by the powerful storm that swept through the region Friday. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

WASHINGTON — If you want a glimpse of some of the worst of global warming, scientists suggest taking a look at U.S. weather in recent weeks.

There have been horrendous wildfires. Oppressive heat waves. Devastating droughts. Flooding from giant deluges. And a powerful freak wind storm called a derecho.

University of Arizona climate scientist Jonathan Overpeck and other experts say this is what global warming looks like. Climate scientists are quick to point out that they cannot attribute any one extreme event to climate change. But in general, they say these are the kinds of weather events that result from it.
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This article was provided by The Associated Press.  (Copyright 2012 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)

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