Impeachment hearings continue Friday as former ambassador to Ukraine testifies

Father records school employees bullying autistic son

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(Youtube)

A New Jersey father said teachers and aides in a specialized autism class bullied his 10-year-old child, and he has the audio to prove it.

Stu Chaifetz posted a 17-minute video to Youtube on Friday. The video had been liked more than 8,000 times and was climbing rapidly as of early Tuesday.

Chaifetz sent his child, Akian, to school in Cherry Hill, just a few miles east of Philadelphia, with a hidden recording device for a full day.

Chaifetz said he made the hidden recording because he couldn’t figure out why the school told him Akian was being violent in class. Akian had no history of violence, Chaifetz said.

When Chaifetz listened to the 6 1/2 hours of audio, he concluded Akian broke down and became violent directly as the result of school employees bullying his son.

In one of several examples in the video, a school employee is recorded calling Akian a profanity after he started crying. Chaifetz said Akian began crying after he wasn’t reassured that he could see his parents.

“This woman stabbed him with words,” Chaifetz said in the video. “Is that not the definition of being a bully: when you take someone with disabilities and you make fun of them, humiliate them and hurt them?”

Chaifetz turned over all the audio to the school board. One of the employees was fired, but the other employees are still with the school system, Chaifetz said.

Akian was transferred to another school and is doing well, WTXF reported.

Chaifetz said he won’t fully identify the teachers in the video in the hopes that they publicly apologize and then resign. He said he doesn’t plan to sue.

The district declined comment, saying it’s a personnel matter.

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