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UNC: Kendall Marshall wrist surgery “successful,” status TBD

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CHAPEL HILL, N.C. -- Kendall Marshall had a screw inserted into his broken right wrist  Monday morning in what UNC officials called a "successful" surgery.

A UNC news release said it won't be determined until later this week whether the sophomore point guard will play in the Sweet 16 game against Ohio on Friday night in St. Louis.

The surgery on the broken scaphoid bone on his non-shooting arm was performed at UNC Hospitals. The screw was inserted to stabilize the fracture, the release said.

Kendall Marshall's father, Dennis Marshall, tweeted Monday afternoon that Marshall is
"Coming off anesthesia...all Kendall keeps asking for is his teammates." He also tweeted: "Get ready to hang another banner" in the Tar Heels' arena.

UNC has its regularly scheduled news conference on Wednesday, and the injury will likely be discussed during that conference.

Dr. Shane Hudnall with Cone Health Sports Medicine explained the process.

"With a basketball player, you need a lot of manual dexterity to pass the ball, even if it's your non-shooting arm," Dr. Hudnall said. "I think they'll probably work on that and be dealing with him day-to-day, which is what it sounds like and what you do with this injury. Without surgery it takes anywhere from six weeks to six months for that to heal."

Marshall hurt his wrist during the second half of Sunday's 87-73 win over Creighton in the Greensboro Coliseum. The injury happened when he was knocked to the floor during a hard foul while driving to the basket.

Marshall, who set a new ACC record for assists in a season, had 18 points and 11 assists in the game. He has had five double-doubles in his last six games.

Information from the Associated Press was used in this report.

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