Exercise Wellness: Weight Lifting Safety

Consistent exercise is an important part of a healthy lifestyle, but it can be hard to know where to begin. There are many exercise options available for people of all skill levels, from beginners to experienced athletes, and it’s important to pick something appropriate for your skill level. If you’ve never followed an exercise plan before, meeting with a personal trainer can help you develop a routine that fits your lifestyle and preferences. They can also help you understand the right techniques to use to avoid injury.

Weight training is a common form of exercise that can be easily adapted to any level of expertise. When you start a new routine, it’s important to start slow and at a lighter weight until you get comfortable with the exercise. Trying to push yourself too hard too quickly is an easy way to get hurt. As you get stronger, you can slowly increase the weight or number of repetitions. Good form is a key component to avoiding injury, as incorrect body mechanics can cause strain and injury.

CrossFit is a popular fitness program right now that focuses on high-intensity weight lifting and exercise. Some of the most common injuries we see from CrossFit participants involve the shoulder, wrist or lower back. Some of these injuries stem from overuse and working out too much, but others are caused by incorrect form. The CrossFit program is safe to use, but as with all exercise, when proper form isn’t followed it can harm the body.

By following the proper form and working at your own pace, everyone should be able to exercise and lift safely. If you aren’t sure or need help knowing where to start, Cone Health has an exceptional team of sports medicine specialists and related rehabilitation professionals dedicated to educating and demonstrating joint-strengthening and injury-preventing techniques individualized to each patient’s capabilities.

Spokesperson Background:

Dr. Jason Rogers is an orthopedic surgeon in Greensboro and a member of Cone Health medical staff. Dr. Rogers received his undergraduate degree from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and completed medical school at the University of South Carolina School of Medicine. He completed his residency in orthopedic surgery at Wake Forest University Baptist Health and his fellowship in orthopedic sports medicine and shoulder reconstruction at Steadman Hawkins Clinic of the Carolinas.