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‘Pirates of the Caribbean’ finale tops box office, flops everywhere else

I’ll admit it, “Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Men Tell No Tales” was relatively entertaining. Most of the movies in the 5-part series are.

But it wasn’t a quality movie, at all.

The film offers audiences much of the same as its predecessors — lots of action, incredible special effects, quick-witted jokes and a plot that’s appealing to all ages.

But it continued the progression of the last three movies and failed to recapture the magic of the first installation, “Pirates of the Caribbean: The Curse of the Black Pearl.”

The movie is directed by Espen Sandberg and Joachim Ronning and features the veteran presence of Johnny Depp (“Edward Scissorhands”) as Capt. Jack Sparrow and Javier Bardem (“No Country for Old Men”) as Capt. Salazar, and relative newcomers in Kaya Scodelario (“Moon”) as Carina Smyth and Brenton Thwaites (“Oculus”) as Henry Turner.

Following the loss of his ship, the Black Pearl, and his crew, Jack Sparrow finds himself in a bit of a dilemma. When he learns that a crew of deadly ghost pirates, led by Capt. Salazar, has broken free of their curse and are on their way to kill him, he joins up with Smyth and Turner to try and turn the tides.

Overall, the movie does what is expected of it. I mean, it looks and sounds like a “Pirates of the Caribbean” movie.

But the chemistry is horrific, especially between Scodelario and Thwaites, and it’s more than obvious that Depp is ready to move on with his career.

Aside from terrific performances from Bardem and Geoffrey Rush (Capt. Barbossa), the movie presents the same overplayed plot that gives the audience no new treasures.

Rottentomatoes gave “Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Men Tell No Tales” a harsh 31% and quite frankly, I think that’s accurate.

On another note, the theme song still holds up incredibly well and is quite possibly the best part of the movie.

Listen here:

THOUGHTS: Simply being an entertaining movie doesn’t do it for me — especially when Walt Disney Pictures has a hand in its creation. There needs to be substance, and aside from Javier Bardem’s performance, everything falls short.

My past reviews: