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Greensboro police warn people to stay off train tracks

GREENSBORO, N.C. -- Taking the time for an important talk, Greensboro Police Officer J.B. Price had the same conversation with dozens of drivers Wednesday afternoon, trying to get across an important message.

"It can take up to a mile or a little more, depending on the cargo that they're carrying, to come to a complete stop," Price said, with train tracks behind him.

Earlier this week, two young men were killed just down the road from the intersection of East Market Street and Franklin Boulevard in Greensboro, raising the total train-related deaths to three this year. Usually the city averages two to three deaths in an entire year.

That's why several police officers were handing out flyers, making sure people are aware of the dangers, whether you're walking or driving.

"Look both ways, making sure its clear, even if the signals and the crossing arms are not flashing," Price said.

Police have noticed people will walk in that area along or directly on the tracks for convenience, but Price says the convenience is a deadly one. That's why police have been going out randomly every week along the tracks with ATVs to patrol and make sure folks aren't trespassing.