Aging: Aging Safely At Home

As we age, most of us hope to live in our own home as long as possible, and most are able to age safely at home with the help of local support services. Aging at home can often be the most comfortable option for the adult, it can be the most cost effective option over time, but it’s important for caregivers to know when to start looking for help from community organizations. As a caregiver, if you notice the older adult you care for is starting to have difficulty completing everyday tasks, such as shopping, cooking or taking care of their home, it may be time to seek help.

Alamance Eldercare is a nonprofit organization that can assess the amount of support an individual may need, connect you to services in the individual’s area, and act as a care manager and advocates for the individual during the aging process.  For example, if a caregiver feels like the older adult is doing okay at home, but some things are starting to change and become more difficult, they can call Alamance Eldercare to discuss what their next steps could look like. They’ll be connected to a specialist that may suggest they meet to assess the individual’s level of care. Based on that assessment, they can reach out to the services they think will help the individual remain at home and put the caregiver in contact with them. This could include services such as an in-home aide or other medical specialists.

The goal of Alamance Eldercare is to help individuals age safely, at home or wherever is best based on the individual’s needs. Individuals can also be referred to Alamance ElderCcare from other agencies or providers, and all of their services are free of charge. The specialists from Alamance Eldercare will keep in touch with the caregiver to check on the individual’s progress and to suggest changes to their care when it’s necessary.

To contact Alamance Eldercare and learn more about how to care for the older adults in your life, call (336) 538-8080.

Spokesperson Background:

Charlie Bryant-Pardini is a care manager for the family caregiver support program at Alamance Eldercare and a member of the Cone Health medical staff. She received her Bachelor of Arts in sociology and her master’s degree in clinical rehabilitation and mental health counseling from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.