Preventing frostbite in cold weather

HIGH POINT, N.C. -- The Berriers are taking the rare opportunity of enjoying the snow on a sunny Sunday in North Carolina. It may be the only snow they get all season, so they’re going up and down the hill outside Sportscenter Athletic Club in High Point.

The need to go up and down that hill again, and again until 7-year-old Lindsay is tuckered out means a lot of time out in the cold.

"Just make sure everybody's dressed form the bottom up, lots of layers, socks, heavy boots, ski bibs,” said Steve Berrier.

If you’re out in the cold for too long without the right attire, you run the risk of frostbite.

"Frostbite depends a lot on exposure and temperature,” said Dr. Courteney Mackuen with the Cone Health Med Center in High Point.

She says the colder it gets, the less time it’ll take for you to start getting symptoms.

"Go in every 15 to 30 minutes, make sure that the hands are still warm, they're not numb and they're the normal color,” Dr. Mackuen said.

For Berrier, it’s a no brainer to check in on his daughter periodically.

"If she's starting to look cold or if you're starting to see red cheeks or blue lips or stuff like that just pay attention, get her out in the car for a few minutes to warm up,” Berrier said.

Another health risk folks at the hospital are seeing a spike in is people getting injured from slipping on black ice.

"Because sometimes don't see the ice you know when you're walking around and they're often falling,” Dr. Mackuen said. "Big thing is falling and hitting your arms, you know we've had a lot of broken wrists and twisted and broken ankles as well."

Another big concern is hypothermia, especially for the homeless community. Dr. Mackuen says symptoms can include physically slowing down and low energy, beyond the symptoms for frostbite.