Future of NCAA, ACC events in Greensboro depending on HB2 outcome

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GREENSBORO, N.C. -- The tug of war over House Bill 2 not only cost North Carolina the 2016 ACC Championship football game that was set to play in Charlotte, but the City of Greensboro 53 NCAA bids.

Two of those games played this season, the most prominent one being the Men's Division I first and second round basketball games.

Soon after the NCAA pulled out, the ACC ultimately deciding to follow suit.

“We've been clearly looking at those numbers and saying ouch a little bit. The basketball championships that were supposed to be here in the spring, those are blue ribbon events. I mean those sell every seat,” said Kim Strable, president of the Greensboro Sports Commission.

Strable says he estimates the city has lost about $140 million in total.

“Well people ask often about what this has done to our relationship with the ACC and the NCAA. The years and years of relationship really continue and have continued and they haven't held us accountable,” he said.

Strable says the NCAA chooses cities in four-year cycles for its championship games. If HB2 isn't repealed both the NCAA and ACC could remain out.

“We would be passed over as a state and of course as a city for the next really five years,” he explained.

However, if state lawmakers repeal HB2 those championship games could come back as soon as 2017.

“We would entertain any opportunity to fulfill any of their tournament or championship needs regardless of when they're scheduled,” Strable said.

FOX8 reached out to both Greensboro Coliseum officials and Mayor Nancy Vaughn for comment, but both declined to comment until a decision is made.