Support Salvation Army Wildfire Relief

Charlotte City Council partially repeals non-discrimination ordinance, provides no public notice

This is an archived article and the information in the article may be outdated. Please look at the time stamp on the story to see when it was last updated.

CHARLOTTE, N.C. — The long political saga of 2016 may have yet another twist in North Carolina.

A fifth special session will start at 10 a.m. Wednesday as proclaimed by Gov. Pat McCrory. The purpose, to address the Public Facilities and Privacy Security Act, commonly referred to as HB2.

The law requires people using government-owned buildings to use the bathroom that corresponds to the sex on their birth certificate and gives the state authority over municipalities setting non-discrimination ordinances involving labor and wages.

This special session is a promised response after Charlotte council said it would repeal it’s non-discrimination ordinance that prompted the legislation.

New developments reveal city council only repealed one part of a three-part discrimination ordinance. It only repealed the section dealing with public accommodations, or the bathroom portion. The other two parts deal with discrimination policies for taxi drivers and contractors with the city. This according to tweets by our news gathering partner, WSOC’s Joe Bruno.

Details of Charlotte’s repeal may have been delayed by lack of public proper notice. Multiple Charlotte news outlets are reporting there was no notice for the meeting, the agenda or even a possible vote.

The final component of Charlotte’s ordinance repeal says, “should S.L. 2016 not be repealed in its entirety by December 31st, 2016, this ordinance shall not be valid.”