Tropical Storm Hermine: Here’s what to expect

Hours after Hurricane Hermine made landfall in Florida, the weakened storm is now working its way up the East Coast.

Hours after Hurricane Hermine made landfall in Florida, the weakened storm is now working its way up the East Coast.

Hours after Hurricane Hermine made landfall in Florida, the weakened storm is now working its way up the East Coast.

Here’s a quick look at the numbers behind the storm and what to expect going into Labor Day weekend.

The numbers

1:50 a.m. — The time Hermine made landfall as a Category 1 hurricane in the Big Bend area of Florida’s Gulf Coast. 11 — Years it had been since a hurricane hit Florida. 1 — Person killed. A homeless man died during the storm after a tree struck him, Florida Gov. Rick Scott said. 30 million — People under tropical storm watches or warnings, which stretch all the way up to New Jersey. 13 million — People under flash flood watches.

The next 24 hours

The biggest threats Friday will be flash flooding from the heavy rainfall in Georgia, South Carolina and North Carolina. Tornadoes are possible throughout the day. Hermine will re-emerge in the Atlantic Ocean Saturday morning near the Outer Banks of North Carolina.

What’s in store Labor Day weekend

Most models show Hermine lingering off the northeast coast, being blocked by a large area of high pressure to the north. The result will be strong on-shore winds stretching from the Outer Banks to Long Island through the holiday weekend, resulting in rough seas, rip currents and beach erosion, but not a lot of rain.