Lengthy legal battle over controversial House Bill 2 begins today

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Since it was signed into law, House Bill 2 has faced opposition and support from people across North Carolina and the United States.

Monday morning will be the first test of what’s set to be a lengthy legal battle over the controversial transgender bathroom bill.

"House Bill 2 violates title IX and also violates the 14th Amendment to the United States Constitution,” said Chris Brook with North Carolina's ACLU.

The American Civil Liberties Union, along with other civil rights groups and even the U.S. Department of Justice, believes the bill is unconstitutional. HB2 requires people in the state to use public bathrooms and changing rooms that correspond with the sex they were assigned at birth.

"They argue that various persons, transgender persons in particular, and seriously adversely affected if this law is allowed to stand in place any longer than it is now,” said Wake Forest Professor of political science John Dinan.

Dina says that's why this hearing is for an injunction to cancel out part of the law before trial. If a judge rules for an injunction in this courthouse on Monday, it would only impact the portion of HB2 that deals with transgenders using public bathrooms. Regardless there will be a trial for HB2 on Nov. 14.

For an injunction, prosecutors have a higher burden of proof.

"To show that there's an irreparable harm to allow the law to stay in effect without in-joining it right now,” Dinan said.

Leaders of the NC Values Coalition say this is easier said than done.

"Nothing is different than what it was before, there wasn't any protection for a person to enter the bathroom opposite of the sex of what they're born as,” said Tami Fitzgerald with the Coalition.