Refunds starting Monday for people who bought Bruce Springsteen tickets in person

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Bruce Springsteen, known by many as "The Boss."

GREENSBORO, N.C. – People who bought Bruce Springsteen tickets from the Greensboro Coliseum in person can get their refund starting Monday.

The box office is closed on Sunday, but will be open from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday through Saturday.

Refunds start at 11 a.m. Monday, according to Andrew Brown, Public Relations Manager for the Greensboro Coliseum Complex. People who bought tickets online have already been automatically refunded.

Springsteen announced on Friday that he would not be playing his planned concert Sunday in Greensboro because of North Carolina’s House Bill 2.

“Some things are more important than a rock show and this fight against prejudice and bigotry — which is happening as I write — is one of them,” Springsteen said in a statement. “It is the strongest means I have for raising my voice in opposition to those who continue to push us backwards instead of forwards.”

Brown said Friday that more than 15,000 tickets were sold. Greensboro Coliseum officials estimated a loss of $100,000 in net revenue due to the cancelled show.

The April 10th concert would have marked the popular “Born in the USA” and Dancing in the Dark” singer’s ninth appearance at Greensboro Coliseum.

Gov. Pat McCrory recently signed the bill, called the Public Facilities Privacy & Security Act, after it was passed by the North Carolina Senate.

House Bill 2 blocks transgender individuals from using public bathrooms that match their gender identity and stops cities from passing anti-discrimination ordinances to protect gay and transgender people. The bill also bans state lawsuits for any type of workplace discrimination.

PayPal also announced earlier this week it canceled plans to open a new global operations center in Charlotte because of the bill, costing the state 400 future jobs.