Many N.C. police agencies don’t drug test officers involved in shootings

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GREENSBORO, N.C. — In most cases, a police officer, sheriff’s deputy or state trooper is more likely to face a drug test after wrecking a cruiser than after shooting someone.

A query of 10 North Carolina law enforcement agencies found that only two agencies require drug or alcohol testing following the use of deadly force, including in incidents that are fatal.

Whether an agency chooses to require drug or alcohol testing is up to the individual departments, said Eddie Caldwell the director of the N.C. Sheriffs’ Association.

“You can argue it either way,” Caldwell said. “Somebody can make the point that after a tragedy the officers ought to be drug tested. You can also make the argument that if you have a good officer who has never had any sign of impairment, that you can undermine their integrity.”

Read more: Greensboro News & Record