High Point City Council to discuss Core City Action Plan

HIGH POINT, N.C. — High Point organizations who have worked tirelessly to revitalize the city’s core are finding out what city leaders want to focus on in the next year.

City officials plan to present the finalized 2014-2015 Core City Action Plan during Monday night’s city council meeting. After the presentation, city council members may vote to adopt the plan.

David Covington is vice chairman of the City Project, an organization aimed at revitalizing 11 square miles of the city’s urban core.

“The difference of what [city officials] may bring to the table tonight is looking at the total core, whereby our study and information has said maybe there is a way to look at this in a smaller segmented arena,” said Covington.

Although details of the Core City Action Plan are not available until the city council meeting, city leaders say the plan will implement projects approved in the city’s budget.

Some examples of the actions already taken include:

  • Streetscaping for Washington Street and South Main Street
  • $25,000 for safety improvements to The Pit
  • A traffic study for dieting N. Main between Parkway and Lexington
  • Land use and transportation study of Five Points
  • $300,592 for investment in the Core
  • Public transit study of the HiTran system.

However, the city council still has to decide which neighborhoods need the most attention when it comes to things like fixing up vacant homes and buildings, as well as offering new business incentives.

Andretti Barnes says improvements to Washington Street are long overdue.

“We’ve taken a beating, we’ve taken the wrong turn in most cases in dealing with this area,” said Barnes, member of the Washington Street Business Association.

Barnes says his neighborhood has been overlooked in the past, and he hopes it doesn’t happen again.

“It’s not just this district, because when we do good, High Point City does good. When High Point City does good, then we’re doing good for the state,” said Barnes.

City Project officials agree, as long as city resources aren’t spread too thin in the process.

“You just start one block at a time,” said Covington. “The end result is that this community will be enhanced, and that the citizens of this town will have a better place to live.”

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