Federal appeals court deals blow to Obamacare

Heritage Home undergoes full-scale inspection

GREENSBORO, N.C. — A building-wide inspection of the Heritage House in Greensboro on Wednesday found several problems but nothing that would shut down the building immediately.

Inspectors noted isolated problems like bed bugs and pest issues. There is also widespread damage to the ceiling and electrical infrastructure in the hallways of the building on the first two floors. Residents also complained about two elevators that have been broken for a long time.

City Councilwoman Sharon Hightower said the inspection is an opportunity to catalog issues to implement change.

“What we do today we know will make a difference,” said Hightower.

The inspection of 177 units took months to plan but came at a time when many residents are aware that some members of city council would like to find a way to shut down the Heritage House.

“It’s very worrisome and I’m just wondering what to do,” said Michael Hunt, who has lived there for two years. “I’m hoping they can clean the place up but, at the same time, I still need a place to live.”

Hunt said the apartment he rents is the only thing he can afford on a fixed income because the cost of utilities is included in the rent.

Hightower said the findings may require some people to find a new place to live but she said the city is committed to using community partnerships to help residents if their home is deemed unlivable.

“It has been a concern of this community for many years but we have gone in to address it and create a permanent fix,” said Hightower.

A similar full-scale inspection was done in 2012. Neighborhood Development Director Barbara Harris said since that inspection, an inspector has been back every 45 days to deal with ongoing issues or new complaints that arise.

Hightower did not criticize the department for past efforts but said this effort will create change.

Hightower said legal action against Heritage Home condo owners is a possibility.