Non-profits replacing Loaves and Fishes in Alamance Co.

BURLINGTON, N.C. — The former Loaves and Fishes Christian Food Ministry building may soon be on an auction block if approved by the state.

Its sudden closure last August caused other non-profits to quickly create a new way to feed the 700 people the food bank served a month.

“People were scrambling,” said Heidi Norwick, vice president of United Way of Alamance County. “They didn’t know where to go. They were hungry.”

Within days, the county came up with a new system to feed those in need.

A system some say works better.

“We think the model’s working,” Norwick said. “That’s what we’re going to stay with.”

“No one organization should do it alone because what happens when they go away,” said Kim Crawford, executive director of Allied Churches of Alamance County.

Places like Allied Churches, the Salvation Army and other non-profits extended their hours, held food drives, and served extra meals to fill in the gap. Something they’re still doing seven months later.

“We are using every inch of this facility for food pantry, soup kitchen, resource center,” said Crawford who opened the pantry three days after Loaves and Fishes closed.

Jerry Currie has been doing his monthly food shopping at Allied Churches for the past few months.

“I got ravioli,” Currie said holding his bag of groceries. “I got meat.”

He had to find a new place to go after Loaves and Fishes shut down.

“I was in a terrible situation when they closed their doors,” Currie said. “I was homeless.”

Ever since Allied Churches opened their pantry, Jerry says he’s always had a bag to take home.

“This place is a blessing,” Currie said.

 

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