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Nurse explains importance of learning infant/child CPR

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Eighty percent of sudden cardiac arrest cases occur in the home.

Therefore it is important for people to learn how to administer cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) to not only adults, but infants and children as well, to potentially save a life in the instance of a medical emergency.

Learning how to administer CPR to infants and children is especially important for expectant or new parents, grandparents, babysitters, older siblings and any other individuals who often serve as caregivers for these age groups.

The American Heart Association now recommends, for family and friends CPR, that if a child or infant is not responding after having their name called out or being tapped, and if they aren't breathing, it is time to begin CPR.

Taking the time to check their pulse can waste precious seconds in the instance of emergency.

Infants’ and children’s lips often turn blue quickly if they have stopped breathing; this can be another important sign to indicate need for CPR if the individual in unresponsive.

Cone Health Women’s Hospital offers regular Infant and Child CPR classes for individuals throughout the community, taught by registered nurses credentialed through the American Heart Association.

The classes teach CPR, as well as focus on what to do if a child or infant is choking, as this is the most common cause of stopped breathing in these age groups.

CPR has been proven to help save lives, and by knowing how to administer this technique, individuals can further ensure the safety of their families and loved ones.

Spokesperson Background:
Lori Davenport is a registered nurse and certified professional childbirth educator at Cone Health Women’s Hospital’s Perinatal Education Department.

Davenport received a Bachelor of Science in nursing from The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in 1986.

She received her certification in professional childbirth education from the Council of Childbirth Education Specialist in 2004.