Med Toss event set for Oct. 26 in Guilford Co.

GUILFORD COUNTY, N.C. — Accidental overdoes kill more people than car crashes, according to Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

In an effort to keep residents safe from harmful misuses of medication, local law enforcement have set up a Med Toss for any unused medicine.

The toss will be held Saturday, Oct. 26, at multiple locations.

On Wednesday, Janet Riley-Wright with Alcoholic Drug Services spoke with FOX8’s Julie Grant on the importance of discarding old prescription medication.

Medications can be harmful to children or to those who are not prescribed the medicine. They can also be misused if kept around the home and used past the prescribed date.

Riley-Wright talks about how the misuse of medication, like taking just a little more than prescribed, can lead to addiction.

The Med Toss will give Guilford County residents a safe way to get rid of old or unused prescription, over the counter and vet medicines. No questions asked.

Officers will then seal the collection boxes and turn them over to the Drug Enforcement Agency for incineration.

For safety reasons, sharps (needles, lancets, EpiPens), liquids and inhalers cannot be accepted.

From 10 a.m.-2 p.m. on Saturday, people can drop off old or unused medicines at the following Greensboro locations:

Walgreens
300 E Cornwallis Dr
1600 Spring Garden St
3701 High Point Rd
5727 High Point Rd
3703 Lawndale Dr
3529 N Elm St
4701 W Market St

Piedmont Drug
4620 Woody Mill Rd, Ste B

Oriental Shrine Club
5010 High Point Rd

From 9 a.m.-1 p.m. on Saturday, people can drop off old or unused medicines at McLarty Drug, 819 N. Main St., High Point.

Can’t make a Med Toss event? Protect your children, pets, and the environment by disposing of unneeded prescription drugs at home. Don’t rush to flush! Most water treatment plants do not filter out medicines in our water.

Instead:
• Dissolve pills or capsules in water.
• Pour all liquids into a plastic bag filled with kitty litter, charcoal, or sawdust.
• Seal the bag and hide in your regular trash.
• Remove personal information from prescription bottles and recycle, if possible.

1 Comment

  • Joe

    “Accidental overdoes kill more people than car crashes, according to Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.”

    What’s an overdoes?

Comments are closed.

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