Elderly Caregiving: Home Care Options vs. Nursing Home Placement

Nursing home placement often symbolizes the loss of independence for older adults, and can also serve as a significant financial burden for family members and/or caregivers. 

Fortunately, our community has many resources and options for older adults that serve as alternatives to nursing home placement, including home care services and adult care centers.

Home care services are often the ideal option for older adults in need of shorter term, in-home medical care, such as individuals recovering from a surgery or illness that required a hospital stay.  Under a physician’s order, home care services typically include registered nurse care, and physical, occupational and/or speech therapies. 

Patients receiving home care still attend regularly scheduled doctor appointments, while the home care nurse and other home care health providers monitor the patient’s condition, and remain in close correspondence with the patient’s primary care providers and/or specialist providers. 

For individuals who require more advanced medical attention on a regular basis, senior day health centers, such as PACE of the Triad, serve as an option for older adults, who are eligible for skilled nursing care, but want to continue to live in the community.  These programs provide the services and care needed to allow participants to remain living safely in the community and in their homes. 

To learn more about care resources available for older adults, it is important to discuss options and eligibility requirements with your doctor.  Fortunately, Cone Health has an exceptional network of primary care providers, geriatric medicine specialists and other related healthcare providers and partnerships with programs, such as PACE of the Triad, all dedicated to providing exceptional care for older adults living in the community.

Spokesperson Background:

Tim Clontz serves as the executive vice president of Cone Health’s Health Services Division. A Charlotte native, Clontz came to the health network through the 1997 merger with Wesley Long Community Hospital, where he served as executive vice president. Clontz joined Wesley Long Community Hospital in 1983 as assistant hospital director. He holds a master’s degree in health administration from Duke University and a bachelor of arts degree in psychology from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He is a Fellow in the American College of Healthcare Executives.  Clontz also serves as the board chairman of Advanced Home Care.